This DIY idea combines two things we love — creative gift wrap ideas and upcycling. If you have not heard of Furoshiki before, it is the art of Japanese fabric wrapping and was originally used as a way to protect valuable goods during transport. So, with Christmas coming up, we decided to make some of our own fabric gift wrap.

This is an easy iron-on craft with three different designs for you to choose from. We also have a video tutorial below to show you a few different ways to tie your fabric gift wrap.

4 ways to tie Furoshiki gift wrap

Fun with fabric

This Japanese wrapping method is a great way to reuse and recycle old fabrics. For our fabric gift wrap, we used some of our cloth napkins in a few different colors. To make them more festive, we designed three holiday patterns — one with tiny Christmas trees, one with reindeer and snowflakes, and one with little houses. 

Because the iron-on designs are intricate, we recommend using a cutting machine for this project. However, we always include the option to cut by hand! After you’re done wrapping your gifts, you can always tuck some greenery into the bow and add a gift tag to personalize each one.

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Tools

Materials

Instructions

The SVG files for this project include two options for each design. One option is the pattern spaced out exactly as we have it shown, but this will waste quite a bit of vinyl. The second option is the design elements grouped closer together, so you can cut them out, then place them individually on your fabric. Be sure to download the PDF Pattern Guide for guidance on where to place each part of the design on your fabric.

 Iron-on fabric gift wrapDIY fabric gift wrapfabric gift wrap

Explore More

Want more gift wrap ideas? Members can access our mini course for all of our gift wrapping tips. Or you can always browse our gift wrap page for wrapping paper, gift tags, and more.

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